Joy, Reflection Mark Opening of WTC Hub and Subway-PATH Connection

A few weeks before the opening of the new World Trade Center Transportation Hub, PATH invited journalists and members of the PATH Riders Council for a behind-the-scenes tour.

WTC Transportation Hub at night

WTC Transportation Hub at night

The new Transportation Hub is the fourth station to occupy the site. The first, built in 1909 as the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad’s Hudson Terminal, was replaced by a new station in 1971 under the original World Trade Center twin towers. After that station was destroyed on September 11, 2001, a temporary station opened in 2003. In October 2013, the West Concourse – the first portion of the new Hub – opened, connecting the Transportation Hub and Brookfield Place (formerly known as the World Financial Center). Platform A opened to regular PATH service in February 2014, followed by Platform B in May 2015. Continues…

Berlin’s Two Transit Agencies Appear on a Single Subway Map

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. The map generated lively discussion on SubChat, a popular transit discussion board, and commenter AEM-7AC #901 noted that the official rail rapid transit map in Berlin displays services provided by two agencies.

SU-Bahn-Ausschnitt_AB

Berlin U-Bahn and S-Bahn have different owners, BVG and DB respectively, yet somehow, the concept of leaving the other off the map is seen as silly. The notion that we should only have an “MTA map” with MTA services is rather silly, especially when the bus maps in Queens listed the private bus lines on the NYCTA maps when they operated. I just don’t see the need to pretend that PATH doesn’t exist just because it goes to that place where “dragons may be” and has “train engineers” in lieu of train operators on what are essentially smaller versions of an R-160. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the subway to Hoboken, Jersey City, and Newark.

Berliner Verkehrsbetriebe (BVG) is the main public transport agency in Berlin, which manages the U-Bahn subway, as well as bus, ferry, and tram networks. Deutsche Bahn (DB) is the German national railway company, which manages the S-Bahn regional rail service. They appear together on the city’s official transit map, and operate with a unified fare structure and payment system. Continues…

Plan B for Penn Station Expansion?

Could Penn Station finally get a grand new entrance on Eighth Avenue? In December 2015, Charles V. Bagli reported in the New York Times that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was considering ways to jumpstart the long-running project to overhaul Penn Station.

Perhaps with an eye toward an announcement at the governor’s State of the State speech in January, state officials are considering a Plan B, including reviving the idea of moving the 5,600-seat theater beneath Madison Square Garden…That would allow for an expansion of Penn Station and new entrances on Eighth Avenue.

On January 6, 2016, Cuomo announced the project, dubbed the Empire Station Complex, as part of his 2016 agenda. Continues…

Will the Maryland Purple Line Appear on the Washington DC Metrorail Map?

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. In the Washington DC metro area, a similar issue will soon be under consideration: whether to include the Maryland Purple Line on the Washington DC Metrorail Map. The Maryland Purple Line is a proposed 16-mile light rail line that would link Bethesda and New Carrolton, with connections to the Washington DC Metrorail Red, Green, and Orange lines.

As the line moves closer to construction, Greater Greater Washington contributor Peter Dovak asks Will the Purple Line appear on the Metro map? Continues…

Transit Hubs: Catalysts for the Urban Economy

Transit hubs in the New York area have long been catalysts for the growth of their surrounding neighborhoods, and the shared economy of the NY & NJ urban core. Five terminals were constructed along the New Jersey shore of the Hudson River during the rail boom of the late 19th Century: Weehawken Terminal, Hoboken Terminal, Pavonia Terminal, Exchange Place, and Communipaw Terminal.

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

On the New York side, Erastus Corning’s New York Central Railroad built Grand Central Station, the precursor to the Grand Central Terminal that stands as a landmark today. By 1910, Pennsylvania Station became the seventh major passenger rail station serving New York City and its urban surroundings. Continues…

Philadelphia’s Transit Map, Managed by SEPTA, Includes PATCO Speedline to NJ

Transit customers benefit when agencies collaborate to create comprehensive maps that display each other’s services. I published the New York & New Jersey Subway Map as a proof-of-concept to demonstrate how a single map could give people a comprehensive, harmonized view of the transit options available throughout the region. It is based on the design of the New York City Subway Map, one of the most recognizable transit wayfinding tools in the world, and incorporates subway, light rail, regional and intercity rail, and ferry services. Tens of thousands of riders now use the New York & New Jersey Subway Map to help them navigate the NYC metro area.

The Philadelphia Rail Transit Map is an excellent example of interagency collaboration in action. It shows rapid transit services provided by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), which operates most lines, and Delaware River Port Authority, which operates the PATCO Line connecting Philadelphia with Camden and several other points in New Jersey. The SEPTA map key includes the disclaimer “not a SEPTA service” next to the PATCO Line, but represents the line using a visual style consistent with all other rapid transit lines in Philadelphia.

Closeup: PATCO Speedline on SEPTA Rail Transit Map

NYC Subway Map Displays AirTrain JFK; Sets Precedent for Including PATH

I published the New York & New Jersey Subway Map as a proof-of-concept to demonstrate how a single map could give people a comprehensive, harmonized view of the transit options available throughout the region. It is based on the design of the New York City Subway Map, one of the most recognizable transit wayfinding tools in the world, and incorporates subway, light rail, regional and intercity rail, and ferry services. Tens of thousands of riders now use the New York & New Jersey Subway Map to help them navigate the NYC metro area.

Subway maps in New York City have a long history of including connections between New York and New Jersey, and services run by other agencies that connect to the subway system. For example, the current New York City Subway map prominently displays AirTrain JFK, which connects terminals at John F. Kennedy International Airport with the A Train at Howard Beach, and the E, J, Z, and Long Island Rail Road at Jamaica. Like PATH, AirTrain JFK is operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. AirTrain is depicted using a visual style that is consistent with the rest of the Subway Map, and clearly indicates that a separate fare is required to use the AirTrain. This is an example of inter-agency cooperation that directly benefits transit customers.

AirTrain JFK on Subway Map

Amtrak, MTA, NJ Transit, Port Authority & RPA on Expanding Trans-Hudson Capacity

As delays and interruptions become more frequent in the century-old North River Tunnels connecting New York and New Jersey, and the political debate grows louder over who will pay for the two new tunnels proposed by Amtrak, some context on the issue is helpful.

In May, the Port Authority, MTA, NJ Transit, Regional Plan Association, and Amtrak jointly convened a Trans-Hudson Summit to discuss the needs, challenges, and solutions for NY & NJ transit infrastructure. The Port Authority also prepared a Profile of the Regional Interstate Transportation Network, a snapshot of trends and market patterns:

Manhattan’s extraordinary concentration of high-value jobs would not be possible without its access to a huge, diverse, and talented labor market over a large geographic area that its extensive transit network makes possible. Efficient public transit is essential to providing the regional mobility needed to sustain its economic competitiveness. And interstate commuting to employment sites outside Manhattan has been growing as well. Access to skilled workers means gains in productivity and profitability for area businesses and a growing standard of living for the entire region.

Continues…

NYC Subway Maps Have a Long History of Including PATH, NJ Waterfront

I published the New York & New Jersey Subway Map as a proof-of-concept to demonstrate how a single map could give people a comprehensive, harmonized view of the transit options available throughout the region. It is based on the design of the New York City Subway Map, one of the most recognizable transit wayfinding tools in the world, and incorporates subway, light rail, regional and intercity rail, and ferry services. Tens of thousands of riders now use the New York & New Jersey Subway Map to help them navigate the NYC metro area.

Closeup look at design of the New York & New Jersey Subway Map

The New York & New Jersey Subway Map includes transit services that connect the growing urban population just across the Hudson River.

The precedent for thinking about the New York & New Jersey region in a unified way parallels its rise as an economic and transportation hub in the early 20th century. In its 1917 ruling in the New York Harbor case, the Interstate Commerce Commission declared, “Historically, geographically, and commercially New York and the industrial district in the northern part of the state of New Jersey constitute a single community.” The ICC’s decision spurred the creation of an independent government entity in 1921 to replace the fractious rule of the private railroads over the port district. A century later, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey also operates the region’s airports, bus terminals, bridges & tunnels crossing state lines, and the Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) subway connecting New York & New Jersey.

The subway maps created to help people navigate the new transit systems built throughout New York City included the Hudson Waterfront and transit connections between New York and New Jersey. Although the Hudson & Manhattan railroad (the precursor to PATH) was still under construction and revenue service wouldn’t begin until 1908, the 1906 Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) map showed the New Jersey waterfront, with Hoboken and Jersey City labeled, and ferry routes connecting NY & NJ.

IRT 1906 subway map

After the IRT, BMT, and Independent Subway System (IND) were consolidated into a single system, the 1944 NYC Board of Transportation map included the Jersey City waterfront, with the H&M lines labeled “Hudson Tubes (to Newark)”, the system’s stations in Manhattan, and Exchange Place station in New Jersey. Continues…

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