What’s the Best Use of Street Space in an Urban Area?

UPDATE: You spoke, and the City Council listened. Enough residents spoke at the April 26, 2016 meeting to convince the City Council to vote to approve a resolution to convert parking spaces to accommodate deliveries. The new Trader Joe’s is scheduled to open in May 2017.

Hoboken, Inc. reports that the fate of a much-anticipated Trader Joe’s supermarket in the north end of Hoboken may come down to 24 on-street parking spaces.

Trader Joe's Hoboken Harlow

Trader Joe’s will occupy the ground floor space in Harlow, a mixed-use development at the corner of 14th Street and Willow Avenue in Hoboken.

Roads and streets existed long before cars, and the notion that a public good should be made available for free or below market prices to a single class of private users is a pretty unfair distribution of public resources. The idea that a small reduction in on-street parking could be an obstacle to the addition of a much-desired and much-needed business shows just how much we miss the mark when parking is considered the highest-priority use of street space in an urban area. Continues…

Berlin’s Two Transit Agencies Appear on a Single Subway Map

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. The map generated lively discussion on SubChat, a popular transit discussion board, and commenter AEM-7AC #901 noted that the official rail rapid transit map in Berlin displays services provided by two agencies.

SU-Bahn-Ausschnitt_AB

Berlin U-Bahn and S-Bahn have different owners, BVG and DB respectively, yet somehow, the concept of leaving the other off the map is seen as silly. The notion that we should only have an “MTA map” with MTA services is rather silly, especially when the bus maps in Queens listed the private bus lines on the NYCTA maps when they operated. I just don’t see the need to pretend that PATH doesn’t exist just because it goes to that place where “dragons may be” and has “train engineers” in lieu of train operators on what are essentially smaller versions of an R-160. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the subway to Hoboken, Jersey City, and Newark.

Berliner Verkehrsbetriebe (BVG) is the main public transport agency in Berlin, which manages the U-Bahn subway, as well as bus, ferry, and tram networks. Deutsche Bahn (DB) is the German national railway company, which manages the S-Bahn regional rail service. They appear together on the city’s official transit map, and operate with a unified fare structure and payment system. Continues…

99 Hudson Street: Jersey City’s Tallest Tower to be Built at Transit Nexus

Ground was broken on January 28th, 2016 for a 900-foot-tall residential tower in Jersey City, at 99 Hudson Street. The tower will be the tallest in both Jersey City and New Jersey, and it is located at the Exchange Place transit hub, with PATH subway, Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, and ferry service within two blocks. Future residents will have multiple transit options, and commute times ranging from 5-10 minutes to Downtown Manhattan, and 15 minutes to Midtown.

99 Hudson St & Jersey City Skyline at Dusk

According to a press release issued in January 2015 from Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop’s office, the tower would contain 760 condominium units. A residential project of this size reflects the growing interest in urban neighborhoods in close proximity to Manhattan, and this project adds significant momentum to the already robust residential development on the Hudson Waterfront that in 2014 surpassed the previous peak seen in 2008. Continues…

Plan B for Penn Station Expansion?

Could Penn Station finally get a grand new entrance on Eighth Avenue? In December 2015, Charles V. Bagli reported in the New York Times that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was considering ways to jumpstart the long-running project to overhaul Penn Station.

Perhaps with an eye toward an announcement at the governor’s State of the State speech in January, state officials are considering a Plan B, including reviving the idea of moving the 5,600-seat theater beneath Madison Square Garden…That would allow for an expansion of Penn Station and new entrances on Eighth Avenue.

On January 6, 2016, Cuomo announced the project, dubbed the Empire Station Complex, as part of his 2016 agenda. Continues…

Will the Maryland Purple Line Appear on the Washington DC Metrorail Map?

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. In the Washington DC metro area, a similar issue will soon be under consideration: whether to include the Maryland Purple Line on the Washington DC Metrorail Map. The Maryland Purple Line is a proposed 16-mile light rail line that would link Bethesda and New Carrolton, with connections to the Washington DC Metrorail Red, Green, and Orange lines.

As the line moves closer to construction, Greater Greater Washington contributor Peter Dovak asks Will the Purple Line appear on the Metro map? Continues…

Transit Hubs: Catalysts for the Urban Economy

Transit hubs in the New York area have long been catalysts for the growth of their surrounding neighborhoods, and the shared economy of the NY & NJ urban core. Five terminals were constructed along the New Jersey shore of the Hudson River during the rail boom of the late 19th Century: Weehawken Terminal, Hoboken Terminal, Pavonia Terminal, Exchange Place, and Communipaw Terminal.

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

On the New York side, Erastus Corning’s New York Central Railroad built Grand Central Station, the precursor to the Grand Central Terminal that stands as a landmark today. By 1910, Pennsylvania Station became the seventh major passenger rail station serving New York City and its urban surroundings. Continues…

Philadelphia’s Transit Map, Managed by SEPTA, Includes PATCO Speedline to NJ

When public transit agencies collaborate and build maps that display each other’s services, riders benefit. For example, the Philadelphia Rail Transit Map shows rapid transit services provided by two agencies: Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), which operates most lines, and Delaware River Port Authority, which operates the PATCO Line connecting Philadelphia with Camden and several other points in New Jersey. The SEPTA map key includes the disclaimer “not a SEPTA service” next to the PATCO Line, but represents the line using a visual style consistent with all other rapid transit lines in Philadelphia.

Closeup: PATCO Speedline on SEPTA Rail Transit Map

NYC Subway Map Displays AirTrain JFK; Sets Precedent for Including PATH

Subway NY NJ proposes more prominently displaying ‘New York’s second subway”–PATH to New Jersey–on the NYC Subway map, for a more complete map of transit in the NY & NJ urban core. The map has a long history of including NJ subway connections. The current subway map also prominently displays AirTrain JFK, which connects terminals at John F. Kennedy International Airport with the A Train at Howard Beach, and the E, J, Z, and Long Island Rail Road at Jamaica. Like PATH, AirTrain JFK is operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

AirTrain JFK on Subway Map

The presence of AirTrain JFK on the NYC subway map sets a precedent for including other non-MTA transit services that directly connect to the subway system, accept the pay-per-ride MetroCard for fare payment, and serve transit needs in the urban core. PATH meets this threshold in all three ways: it is even more centrally located in the urban core than AirTrain JFK, also accepts the pay-per-ride MetroCard, and connects to 18 subway lines: B,D,F,M at 33rd, F,M at 23rd, 1,2,3,L,F,M at 14th, and 2,3,4,5,A,C,J,Z, and R at Fulton Center.

NY Officials, on Hudson River Tunnels: “It’s New Jersey, so Who Cares?”

On Sunday, NorthJersey.com published an opinion piece by Philip Mark Plotch that shed light on the political attitudes that have led to the precarious and deteriorating state of cross-Hudson transit. Plotch is well-placed to offer this insight: he was previously director of WTC Development for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, a joint city-state public entity created to plan redevelopment of Lower Manhattan after the September 11 attacks. He is currently professor and director of the MPA program at St. Peter’s University, and author of Politics Across the Hudson, a book about the megaproject to rebuild the Tappan Zee bridge.

While writing his book, Plotch interviewed numerous New York state officials to better understand why they didn’t promote Access to the Region’s Core (ARC), the cross-Hudson tunnel project canceled by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie in 2010. Their answers, Plotch says, “made my head spin.” Continues…

Amtrak, MTA, NJ Transit, Port Authority & RPA on Expanding Trans-Hudson Capacity

As delays and interruptions become more frequent in the century-old North River Tunnels connecting New York and New Jersey, and the political debate grows louder over who will pay for the two new tunnels proposed by Amtrak, some context on the issue is helpful.

In May, the Port Authority, MTA, NJ Transit, Regional Plan Association, and Amtrak jointly convened a Trans-Hudson Summit to discuss the needs, challenges, and solutions for NY & NJ transit infrastructure. The Port Authority also prepared a Profile of the Regional Interstate Transportation Network, a snapshot of trends and market patterns:

Manhattan’s extraordinary concentration of high-value jobs would not be possible without its access to a huge, diverse, and talented labor market over a large geographic area that its extensive transit network makes possible. Efficient public transit is essential to providing the regional mobility needed to sustain its economic competitiveness. And interstate commuting to employment sites outside Manhattan has been growing as well. Access to skilled workers means gains in productivity and profitability for area businesses and a growing standard of living for the entire region.

A Vital Link: Expanding Transportation Capacity Across the Hudson
May 7, 2015

The morning sessions began with a series of presentations from the sponsoring transportation agencies, each of which focused on different aspects of the trans-Hudson challenge. The presentations covered the changes in the volume and nature of trans-Hudson travel that have occurred over the past generation; the condition of the physical infrastructure and capacity constraints on the trans-Hudson crossings and facilities; and referenced potential solutions to expand transportation capacity for further discussion, including project costs and benefits.

Moderator
Thomas K. Wright, President, Regional Plan Association

Presentations
Andrew Lynn, Director, Planning & Regional Development, The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey
Drew Galloway, Chief of Planning & Performance, NECIID, Amtrak
Veronique Hakim, Executive Director, NJ TRANSIT
Rich Roberts, Chief, NEC Trans-Hudson Projects, NJ TRANSIT
Bill Wheeler, Director of Planning, Metropolitan Transportation Authority

A Vital Link: Expanding Transportation Capacity Across the Hudson
May 7, 2015

The second morning session began with remarks from the distinguished panelists listed below representing other partners in addressing the trans-Hudson challenge, who responded to the agency presentations. Then there was a moderated discussion of potential solutions and a process for moving forward.

Moderator
Thomas K. Wright, President, Regional Plan Association

Distinguished Panelists:
Peter Rogoff, Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy, U.S. Department of Transportation
Joel Ettinger, Executive Director, New York Metropolitan Transportation Council
Mary K. Murphy, Executive Director, North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority
Martin Robins, Founding Director, Voorhees Transportation Center, Rutgers University

Amtrak Panelists:
Anthony Coscia, Chairman of the Board
Stephen Gardner, Vice President, NECIID
Drew Galloway, Chief of Planning & Performance, NECIID

New Jersey Panelists:
Veronique Hakim, Executive Director, NJ TRANSIT
Rich Roberts, Chief, NEC Trans-Hudson Projects, NJ TRANSIT

New York Panelists:
Polly Trottenberg, Commissioner, New York City Department of Transportation
Bill Wheeler, Director of Planning, Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Port Authority Panelists:
John Degnan, Chairman
Scott Rechler, Vice-Chairman
Patrick Foye, Executive Director
Andrew Lynn, Director, Planning & Regional Development

Regional Plan Association Panelist:
Elliot G. Sander, Chairman

A Vital Link: Expanding Transportation Capacity Across the Hudson
May 7, 2015

This panel discussed innovative financing models, including the role of public-private partnerships, in funding the massive capital investments required to substantially expand cross-Hudson transit capacity.

Moderator
Rohit Aggarwala, Principal, Bloomberg Associates

Panelists
D.J. Gribbin, Managing Director, Macquarie Group
Chris Ireland, Director of Infrastructure Investments, Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan
Sam Schwartz, President, CEO & Founder, Sam Schwartz Engineering
Robert Yaro, President Emeritus & Senior Advisor, Regional Plan Association

A Vital Link: Expanding Transportation Capacity Across the Hudson
May 7, 2015

This panel explored the project delivery process and the labor, regulatory and environment permitting involved in expanding cross-Hudson transit capacity, and possible strategies for “fast-tracking” necessary projects of national and regional significance.

Moderator
Joshua Schank, President & CEO, Eno Center for Transportation

Panelists
Mark Chertok, Principal, Sive, Paget & Riesel
Philip Howard, Chair, Common Good
Marilyn J. Taylor, Dean, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania

« Previous PageNext Page »