Berlin’s Two Transit Agencies Appear on a Single Subway Map

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. The map generated lively discussion on SubChat, a popular transit discussion board, and commenter AEM-7AC #901 noted that the official rail rapid transit map in Berlin displays services provided by two agencies.

SU-Bahn-Ausschnitt_AB

Berlin U-Bahn and S-Bahn have different owners, BVG and DB respectively, yet somehow, the concept of leaving the other off the map is seen as silly. The notion that we should only have an “MTA map” with MTA services is rather silly, especially when the bus maps in Queens listed the private bus lines on the NYCTA maps when they operated. I just don’t see the need to pretend that PATH doesn’t exist just because it goes to that place where “dragons may be” and has “train engineers” in lieu of train operators on what are essentially smaller versions of an R-160. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the subway to Hoboken, Jersey City, and Newark.

Berliner Verkehrsbetriebe (BVG) is the main public transport agency in Berlin, which manages the U-Bahn subway, as well as bus, ferry, and tram networks. Deutsche Bahn (DB) is the German national railway company, which manages the S-Bahn regional rail service. They appear together on the city’s official transit map, and operate with a unified fare structure and payment system. Continues…

99 Hudson Street: Jersey City’s Tallest Tower to be Built at Transit Nexus

Ground was broken on January 28th, 2016 for a 900-foot-tall residential tower in Jersey City, at 99 Hudson Street. The tower will be the tallest in both Jersey City and New Jersey, and it is located at the Exchange Place transit hub, with PATH subway, Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, and ferry service within two blocks. Future residents will have multiple transit options, and commute times ranging from 5-10 minutes to Downtown Manhattan, and 15 minutes to Midtown.

99 Hudson St & Jersey City Skyline at Dusk

According to a press release issued in January 2015 from Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop’s office, the tower would contain 760 condominium units. A residential project of this size reflects the growing interest in urban neighborhoods in close proximity to Manhattan, and this project adds significant momentum to the already robust residential development on the Hudson Waterfront that in 2014 surpassed the previous peak seen in 2008. Continues…

Plan B for Penn Station Expansion?

Could Penn Station finally get a grand new entrance on Eighth Avenue? In December 2015, Charles V. Bagli reported in the New York Times that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was considering ways to jumpstart the long-running project to overhaul Penn Station.

Perhaps with an eye toward an announcement at the governor’s State of the State speech in January, state officials are considering a Plan B, including reviving the idea of moving the 5,600-seat theater beneath Madison Square Garden…That would allow for an expansion of Penn Station and new entrances on Eighth Avenue.

On January 6, 2016, Cuomo announced the project, dubbed the Empire Station Complex, as part of his 2016 agenda. Continues…

Will the Maryland Purple Line Appear on the Washington DC Metrorail Map?

New York & New Jersey Subway Map shows how we can give people a comprehensive view of transit options in the NYC region. In the Washington DC metro area, a similar issue will soon be under consideration: whether to include the Maryland Purple Line on the Washington DC Metrorail Map. The Maryland Purple Line is a proposed 16-mile light rail line that would link Bethesda and New Carrolton, with connections to the Washington DC Metrorail Red, Green, and Orange lines.

As the line moves closer to construction, Greater Greater Washington contributor Peter Dovak asks Will the Purple Line appear on the Metro map? Continues…

Transit Hubs: Catalysts for the Urban Economy

Transit hubs in the New York area have long been catalysts for the growth of their surrounding neighborhoods, and the shared economy of the NY & NJ urban core. Five terminals were constructed along the New Jersey shore of the Hudson River during the rail boom of the late 19th Century: Weehawken Terminal, Hoboken Terminal, Pavonia Terminal, Exchange Place, and Communipaw Terminal.

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

West Shore Railroad Terminal, Weehawken, NJ. c. 1911

On the New York side, Erastus Corning’s New York Central Railroad built Grand Central Station, the precursor to the Grand Central Terminal that stands as a landmark today. By 1910, Pennsylvania Station became the seventh major passenger rail station serving New York City and its urban surroundings. Continues…

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